About Cerezyme

Cerezyme is an FDA-approved enzyme replacement therapy indicated for the treatment of Type 1 Gaucher disease. Since its FDA approval in 1994, Cerezyme has been used to treat more than 2,000 Gaucher Disease Type 1 (GD1) patients in the US¹.

  • In clinical trials, Cerezyme improved anemia and thrombocytopenia, reduced spleen and liver size and decreased cachexia.
  • Additionally, it has been observed in Gaucher Registry data that Cerezyme therapy helped reduce or relieve many of the signs and symptoms of Type 1 Gaucher disease, including anemia, low platelet count, bone pain, and enlarged spleen and liver2.
  • For over 20 years, Cerezyme has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for Type 1 Gaucher disease in adults and children3,4,5.

Indication & Usage

Cerezyme® (imiglucerase for injection) is indicated for long-term enzyme replacement therapy for pediatric and adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Type 1 Gaucher disease that results in one or more of the following conditions:

  1. anemia
  2. thrombocytopenia
  3. bone disease
  4. hepatomegaly or splenomegaly

Important Safety Information

Approximately 15% of patients have developed IgG antibodies to Cerezyme during the first year of therapy. Approximately 46% of patients with detectable IgG antibodies experienced symptoms of hypersensitivity, and these patients have a higher risk of hypersensitivity. It is suggested that patients be monitored periodically for IgG antibody formation during the first year of treatment.

Hypersensitivity has also been observed in patients without detectable IgG antibodies. Symptoms suggestive of hypersensitivity have been noted in approximately 6.6% of all patients, and anaphylactoid reactions in less than 1%. Treatment with Cerezyme should be approached with caution in patients who have exhibited hypersensitivity symptoms such as pruritus, flushing, urticarial, angioedema, chest discomfort, dyspnea, coughing, cyanosis, and hypotension. Pre-treatment with antihistamines and/or corticosteroids and a reduced rate of infusion may allow continued treatment in most patients.

In less than 1% of patients, pulmonary hypertension and pneumonia have been observed during treatment with Cerezyme. These are known complications of Gaucher disease regardless of treatment. Patients with respiratory symptoms in the absence of fever should be evaluated for the presence of pulmonary hypertension.

Approximately 13.8% of patients have experienced adverse events related to treatment with Cerezyme. Some of these are injection site reactions such as discomfort, pruritus, burning, swelling or sterile abscess at the site at the site of venipuncture. Additional adverse reactions that have been reported include nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, fatigue, headache, fever, dizziness, chills, backache, and tachycardia. Transient peripheral edema has also been reported for this therapeutic class of drug.

To report suspected adverse reactions, contact Sanofi Genzyme at 800-745-4447, option 2

Please see Full Prescribing Information (PDF).

References

  1. Data on file at Genzyme
  2. Pastores GM, Weinreb NJ, Aerts H, et al. Therapeutic goals in the treatment of Gaucher disease. Semin Hematol 2004:41(suppl 5);4-14.
  3. Grabowski GA, Leslie N, Wenstrup R. Enzyme therapy for Gaucher disease: the first 5 years. Blood Rev 1998;12:115–33.
  4. Weinreb NJ, Charrow J, Andersson HC, et al. Effectiveness of enzyme replacement therapy in 1028 patients with type 1 Gaucher disease after 2 to 5 years of treatment: a report from the Gaucher registry. Am J Med. 2002;113:112-119.
  5. Andersson H, Kaplan P, Kacena, et al. Eight-Year Clinical Outcomes of Long-Term Enzyme Replacement Therapy for 884 Children With Gaucher Disease Type 1. Pediatrics 2008;122;1182